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Vaccines to Prevent the Flu

Topic Overview

Can you prevent the flu?

You can help prevent the flu by getting a flu vaccine every year, as soon as it is available. The vaccine prevents most cases of the flu. But even when the vaccine doesn't prevent the flu, it can make symptoms less severe and reduce the chance of problems from the flu.

What types of flu vaccines are there?

Flu viruses are always changing. Each year's flu vaccine is made to protect against viruses that are likely to cause disease that year. Ask your doctor whether or not a vaccine is safe for you and which one may be best for you.

Flu vaccines are made to work against more than one strain of flu. For example, a trivalent vaccine works against three strains, and a quadrivalent vaccine works against four strains of flu. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) does not recommend one version over the other.

Who should get a flu vaccine?

Everyone age 6 months or older should get a flu vaccine each year, except for people with a fever or those who have had serious problems with vaccines in the past. The flu vaccine lowers the chance of getting and spreading the flu.

Who is at high risk for problems from the flu?

The flu vaccine is very important for people who are at high risk for getting other health problems from the flu. This includes:

  • Anyone 50 years of age or older.
  • People who live in a long-term care center, such as a nursing home.
  • All children 6 months through 18 years of age.
  • Women who will be pregnant during the flu season.
  • Adults and children 6 months and older who have long-term heart or lung problems, such as asthma.
  • Adults and children 6 months and older who needed medical care or were in a hospital during the past year because of diabetes, chronic kidney disease, or a weak immune system (including HIV or AIDS).
  • People who have any condition that can make it hard to breathe or swallow (such as a brain injury or muscle disorders).
  • People who can give the flu to others who are at high risk for problems from the flu. This includes all health care workers and close contacts of people age 65 or older.

Credits

Current as of: August 31, 2020

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review: Kathleen Romito MD - Family Medicine
Adam Husney MD - Family Medicine

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March 2020 Newsletter from South Bay OBGYN

March Awareness March is National Multiple Sclerosis, Colorectal Cancer, Endometriosis and Trisomy Awareness month. Many illnesses that we at SB OBGYN are here to assist you with.  

COVID-19 Update

With the new state of California Stay At Home Order, South Bay OBGYN continues to be open to take care of the needs of our patient’s.  To ensure the safety of not only our staff, but you as the patient too, we have equipped our office’s with PPE and we ask that all patient’s do their part to prevent the spread of COVID:

If you are positive or have been exposed to a positive person or have cold / flu symptoms, we will require that you have your appointment via TELEHEALTH. We continue to be open for all types of appointments, including TELEHEALTH as an alternative for those who would prefer to stay in the safety of their homes. Whether it’s a telephone call or an actual video chat, we want everyone to be comfortable and remain safe.

More About Telehealth

Please contact our office for more information on COVID-19 testing requirements by dialing (619) 267 – 8313, option 5 from our main menu to speak with our Nurse Line.